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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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The Right Rev. Cicero Stephens Hawks, D. D., Bishop of Missouri.

THE distinguished subject of this sketch was born May 26th, 1812, at Newborn, North Carolina. His father's family was of English extraction, and his mother's was of Irish origin. They settled in North Carolina at an early day. It was his misfortune, however, never to know the sweetest boon of childhood — a mother's affection, she having died when he was but two years of age. She was exemplary as a Christian, a wife, and mother. His father, Francis Hawks, had nine children, of which the subject of this memoir was the youngest son, and on the death of the mother, he was taken under the affectionate charge of the eldest sister, Phebe, who afterward married the Hon. Walter Anderson, late chief-justice of the Supreme Court of Florida, and who still survives her distinguished husband, and resides in Pensacola. It may be here remarked that the two eldest brothers belong to the ministry. The Rev. Francis L. Hawks, D. D., LL. D., is the present rector of Calvary Church, New York, and the Rev. William N. Hawks is the rector of Trinity Church, Columbus, Georgia; both of them are learned, popular, and eloquent divines, and the former has been thrice elected bishop.

The father of Cicero Stephens Hawks gave to him all the advantages of an early education, and among his first classical teachers was the late Right Rev. George W. Freeman, D. D., missionary bishop of the southwest. After a due preparatory course, at the age of fifteen he entered the Sophmore class, of the University of North Carolina. He was indefatigable as a student; not only did he excel in his scholastic duties, but there were none who could compete with him in knowledge of general literature. He remained three years at the University, and then graduated. Whilst there he gave indications of his future eminence. His mind was comprehensive, brilliant, and logical, and his memory so impressive that whatever it acquired was ever after recorded upon its tablet.

After leaving college, in accordance with the wishes of his father, and his own inclination, he commenced the study of the law in his native town, under instruction of the late Hon. Wm. Gaston, one of the most accomplished jurists and statesmen of his time. He had almost completed his legal studies when his father died, and, forming new plans for the future, in 1833 he went to New York, furnished with introductory letters to Chancellor Kent and other prominent gentlemen, and for a short time continued to pursue his studies for the legal profession.

A little while after his advent in New York, his ambition became chastened, and his early views became elevated, by reading some authors on theology under the awakening influences of conscience; he felt a call to the ministry, and under the direction of his brother, the Rev. Francis L.

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Hawks, he commenced his course of studies, and was ordained a deacon by Bishop Onderdonk, of New York. His first charge of a congregation was in Ulster county, New York; he officiated also in the neighborhood of Red Hook. When he had attained the age of twenty-four, he was qualified with the full powers of the ministry. He received many invitations, to preside over congregations, from different sections of the Union, and finally accepted the rectorship of Trinity Church, Buffalo. His winning and efficient eloquence, and the influence of an exemplary life, soon increased the number of his parishioners, and it was necessary to build another church of larger dimensions, and he was beloved by his numerous congregation.

In 1843, he received an invitation to the rectorship of Christ's Church, St. Louis, which he accepted by the advice of his friends. He became at once most popular in the new field of his labors, and, with the wishes of the resident ministry of the diocese of Missouri, in 1844, he was elected bishop unanimously by the House of Bishops, and the election confirmed by the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies; and, October 20, 1844, he was consecrated by Bishop Chase of Illinois, in Christ Church, Philadelphia; Bishops Chase and Cobbs, the former of New Hampshire, and the latter of Georgia, were consecrated at the same time. Bishop Hawks, we believe, is the youngest bishop that has ever been consecrated in the Episcopal Church. He was, at his consecration, only thirty-two years of age. Possessing an expansive and comprehensive mind, he was soon familiar with his new sphere, and his administration over his extensive diocese has been popular and efficient.

In 1847, Bishop Hawks received the honorary degree of D. D. from the University of Missouri; at the same time that of LL. D. was conferred on the late Thomas H. Benton.

In 1849, St. Louis was visited by the most dangerous of all known maladies, the Asiatic cholera. It was at this season of tribulation, when life held by so precarious a tenure, and hundreds were flying from the city, that Bishop Hawks was found ministering comfort by the side of the sick and the dying. He acted truly the part, during this fearful crisis, of an exemplary Christian and a faithful pastor to his fold. Five years afterward, death launched his shaft into his household, and claimed as a victim the gentle being who brought happiness to his hearthstone, the wife of his bosom. Her maiden name was Ann Jones, daughter of Dr. Hugh and Anna Maria Guyon Jones, of Huguenot descent, natives of North Carolina. Her illness was a lingering one, yet she was sustained by Christian fortitude, and her sufferings assuaged by the balm distilled by an approving conscience. She left one daughter, still of a tender age, affording solace to the father in the dark hour of affliction. Bishop Hawks had also for many years the charge of three of his deceased brother's children, two sons and a daughter, who are now comfortably settled in married life.

Bishop Hawks, while firmly advocating and maintaining the tenets of his Church, has no sweeping denunciation of others of different views. He is a true Christian, and while free from most of the weaknesses incident to humanity, he is charitable to the errors of others. His mind is a repository of learning garnered from every source, and he possesses rave executive powers. His writings, though not as voluminous as his friends

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and admirers would wish, are, nevertheless, known and popular, having been for many years a contributor to the various journals. He edited some years ago, "The Boys' and Girls' Library" for the Messrs. Harper, and also Appleton's "Library for my Young Countrymen." He wrote several of the volumes of "Uncle Philip's Conversations for the Young," and was the author of "Friday Christian; or, the Firstborn of Pitcairn Island." In the pulpit, he wields the potent power of true eloquence. His discourse, convincing by the strength of argument, is relieved and adorned by appropriate rhetorical beauties; and his manner, without being glowing or impressive, has the gentle fervency of Christian inspiration. With health unimpaired, and his mind rich in scholastic lore and the wealth of practical experience, the diocese of Missouri can hope, for many years, his popular superintendence.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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