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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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James G. Soulard.

JAMES G. SOULARD was born in St. Louis, July 17th, 1798. He was sent to the well-known schoolmaster of the village, Jean Baptiste Trudeau. After the retirement of his father, Antoine Soulard, from the surveyorship

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of Upper Louisiana, he received from him much instruction, as he had been highly educated in France previous to his entrance in the army. He was learned in the practical duties of agricultural life, as his father possessed a superior farm, whose limits now almost embrace the heart of the city of St. Louis.

James G. Soulard was married in early life to Miss Eliza M. Hunt, daughter of Thomas Hunt and of Eunice Wellington, both of Watertown, Massachusetts. Her father, Colonel Thomas Hunt, was an officer in the United States army, and fought for his country during the trying period of the Revolution. He was stationed at Belle Fontaine, then the military post of the country, before the building of the Arsenal, and died at the fort, where he commanded. Four weeks afterward the amiable wife and devoted mother paid the last debt which humanity pays to nature, and was buried by the side of her husband. The turf is now green above them both, but their memories are still cherished by friends and children.

James G. Soulard has been engaged in mercantile pursuits, which he pursued for some time in the state of Illinois, and for many years was one of the hardy pioneers on the outskirts of civilization. He was for a short time a resident of Fort Snelling, Minnesota. He was made deputy-surveyor of the general government, and while a resident of Jo Daviess county, Illinois, he had so much the confidence of the community, that he was elected county recorder and county surveyor, which offices he held for many years. For twenty-two years he has resided near the flourishing city of Galena, Illinois, where he has been farming extensively, and, by his taste for the collection of the finest fruits, and skill in cultivating them, he has done much to call the attention of agriculturists to the profits arising from fruit-culture, and the blessing to the general health which attends their consumption. Mr. Soulard was the first to introduce the grape into that section of country, and now there are many flourishing vineyards which evince the success of its cultivation. He was also coast-master of Galena.

Mr. Soulard has a large family of children — one son and seven daughters. The daughters are all married. He is blessed with still a fine constitution, though he has drawn heavily upon it during the hardships incident to his pioneer life, and Time has but gently touched him during the more than threescore years of his existence, leaving scarcely an evidence yet of his "decaying fingers." His health is vigorous, his step elastic, his form erect, and possessing no mark of the decrepitude of age. He is warm and constant in his friendship, and, from his amiable deportment, has always been popular. He was born in St. Louis when it was under a foreign domination, and is one of the few still left who recollect when our great Metropolis had less than one thousand inhabitants.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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