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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Major Henry S. Turner.

MAJOR HENRY S. TURNER was born April 1st, 1811, in King George's county, state of Virginia. His parents were both of highly respectable families of that state, his mother being a Randolph, a name so well known and honored in the Old Dominion. Young Turner's early education received proper attention, and, after a preliminary preparation, he was sent to West Point Academy, in which institution he remained four years, and successfully passed through the physical and mental ordeal to which the cadets are subjected before they are admitted as officers in the service of the United States.

As an officer, Henry S. Turner occupied a prominent position; and when first-lieutenant of dragoons was honored by his country's preference, being selected, with two other officers of the same regiment, to be sent to the Royal School of Cavalry, at Saumur, France, for the purpose of learning the cavalry tactics, which the French had carried to such remarkable perfection. He creditably acquitted himself of his honorable mission; and after a residence of fifteen months at the Royal Military Academy, he returned to the United States in 1840. Immediately on his return home, being assisted by one of his colleagues who had accompanied him abroad, he translated the French Cavalry Tactics, and by judicious modifications, adapted them to the requirements of our service. So highly were his labors appreciated that his work is now the standard authority of the cavalry corps of the United States.

Unfortunately, the life of a soldier, from the controlling nature of his vocation, being liable to be ordered at any time to any part of the Union, and at all times subjected to the dangers of the battle-field in the emergency of war, compels many officers to a life of celibacy, who are formed by nature to appreciate, to their fullest extent, the honorable and endearing relation of husband and father. Though Henry S. Turner was early ambitious of gathering the honors incidental to his military career, he was not proof against the poetical maxim of the Mantuan bard, "Amor vincit omnia, et cedamus amori." Having become acquainted with Miss Julia M. Hunt, the beautiful and accomplished daughter of Theodore Hunt and Anne Lucas, he sought her hand in marriage, and the nuptials took place in February, 1841. Lieutenant Turner, since he had become an officer of the United States, however he may have thirsted for military glory, from the comparative state of peace of the country, had been doomed to inaction. At length there were threatening signs on the political horizon, and it became apparent to all that a storm was brewing between our country and Mexico. Since the battle of San Jacinto, in which a United States general and United States citizens were chiefly instrumental in defeating the troops of Mexico, that power had ever regarded our government with a jealous and malignant eye; and when by treaty the lone star of Texas shone in the glorious constellation of our Union, she declared that Texas was still a province of her dominions, and evidently determined to bring about a collision. In the war which followed, Lieutenant Turner

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took an active and chivalrous part, serving through the entire campaign and was raised to the rank of captain.

In 1848 Captain Turner was breveted major; and in the records of the war department is the honorable testimonial of the nature of his promotion — "for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of San Pasqual, San Gabriel, and Plains of Mesa in California."

In 1848 Major Turner retired from the army and turned his attention to the pleasing pursuits of agriculture near St. Louis. He remained thus engaged till 1850, when he received the appointment of assistant treasurer of the United States at St. Louis, which office he held until 1853, when he resigned, and going to California, there established the banking-house of Lucas, Turner & Co. This house remained in operation until 1855, when Major Turner returned to St. Louis and became a member of the banking firm of Lucas & Simonds, in which he continued until the dissolution of copartnership in 1858. In this year he was solicited to become a candidate for the General Assembly of Missouri, and was elected to that honorable body.

Major Turner is well known to the inhabitants of St. Louis, and is popular with all classes of the community. He possesses the frankness of the soldier, is warm in his friendship, and has, in a remarkable degree, that suavity of manner which characterizes the well-raised sons of the "Old Dominion." He is a zealous advocate of internal improvements, and is ready to second all works of public enterprise. He is practical in his thoughts, zealous and earnest in action, and is known as an efficient worker both in a military and civil capacity. He was one of the corporation of the St. Louis Agricutural and Mechanical Association, and since its commencement has held the responsible trust of treasurer of the association.

Major Turner has filled many vocations in life, and all of them with ability. As a banker he was honorable, and versed in all the commercial finesse of the day; as a legislator he is liberal, practical, and comprehensive in his views; and as a military officer, the official documents of the war department bear testimony to his merit, and the book of French cavalry tactics which he translated and modified to the requirements of our service, of his talents and acquirements.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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