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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Alexander Kayser.

ALEXANDER KAYSER was born at St. Goarshausen, on the Rhine February 15th, 1815. Reinhard Kayser, his father, was a man of high repute in the town, and for twenty-eight years magistrate, under the Duke of Nassau; he had been educated as an attorney, but, holding office, did not practice.

As might be inferred from the high position of his father, young Alexander Kayser had every opportunity of cultivating his mind in the best schools, and, at the age of sixteen, showing a preference for architecture he was sent to Frankfort-on-the-Main, that he might accomplish himself in that science. However, he remained but a short time there, owing to some reverses, and commenced learning the carpenter's trade. At the age of eighteen, seeing a pamphlet, written by Dr. Duden, a German physician, who had travelled extensively over the United States, lived some time in Warren county, in this state, and spoken most favorably of its institutions and resources, he determined to leave Germany for the Western Republic; and, accompanied by his brother Henry and his sister, who has become Mrs. Bates, he left Europe, and, after a tedious journey, finally reached St. Louis, June 18th, 1833. He purchased a farm contiguous to St. Louis, on which his sister still resides, but, not liking farming, and being prostrated by an attack of sickness, he went to Beardstown, Illinois, and pursued the profession of teacher. In 1838, he returned to St. Louis, where his brother Henry was employed, in the surveyor-general's office, and he obtained a situation in the land-office, as acting register under the efficient charge of Mr. De Munn.

During the municipal magistracy of William Carr Lane, he was appointed street commissioner, to which he was again reappointed, during the administration of the Hon. John F. Darby; but he shortly resigned his office, commenced the study of the law, and was admitted to the bar in 1841.

In 1844, Mr. Kayser was appointed delegate to the Convention in Baltimore, and, in 1846, was lieutenant in the Mexican War.

In 1852, he was chosen by the democratic party, one of the nine presidential electors of the state.

For many years Mr. Kayser has been the most prominent man in St. Louis, in taking an active interest in grape culture, and showing how greatly Missouri is adapted to the culture of the grape. He gave a premium, in 1845, so as to bring forward specimens of the best native wine, and, in 1849, offered two premiums of $100 each, and one of $125, for the same purpose. He was married to Miss Eloise P. Morrison, granddaughter of General Daniel Bissell. He is an enterprising and use citizen, and highly esteemed in the state of his adoption.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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