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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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William G. Clark.

THE parents of William Clark belonged to the state of Maryland, and he was born in Baltimore county, November 4th, 1818 His grandmother still lives at the venerable age of ninety-five years. His father, Matthew Clark kept a hotel and store combined, and raised in a respectable manner a family of six children, giving them all a fair education, and training them to habits of early industry.

William G. Clark was kept at school until he reached the age of seventeen, and then he became clerk to Mr. John Taylor, a dry-goods merchant, with whom he did not long remain; for, being invited by Mr. Trowbridge, the brother-in-law of Mr. Taylor, who was preparing to locate in the west, to accompany him to his new home, he accepted the offer, and, on reaching St. Louis in 1836, he commenced business with him in the capacity of clerk. He remained three years in that situation, and, understanding by this time perfectly the routine of commercial pursuits, in 1839 he commenced business on his own account, in conjunction with two others, and a firm was established under the title of Jones, Clark and Gill, who carried on the clothing business. He continued as clothing merchant until 1842, and then, believing that the lumber business offered greater inducements, he entered upon his new pursuit, and soon became one of the most extensive and successful lumber merchants in the city.

Mr. Clark, by his own efforts, has reached affluence and a commercial portion, which has given his name weight and respect in the community. He is extensively associated with all enterprises which serve to strengthen and increase the business elements of St. Louis. He is a director in the Southern Bank, and essentially promoted the building of the City University, which promises to elevate so much the standard of education in our city, and is a trustee of the institution. He has been for many years a member of the church, and is a director in the Lindell Hotel, now in the course of erection.

Mr. Clark has been twice married; first to Miss Julia Miller, of Baltimore, in 1840, and had a large family of ten children. His present estimable lady was Miss Mary Bede Parks, daughter of Joseph Parks, of St. Charles county, Missouri. Mr. Clark has been a resident of St. Louis for twenty-three years, and is well known in the community as a man of sterling worth, who is well worthy of the fair fame, which a life of integrity has established, and of the affluence he has amassed by his industry. He is the owner of that fine block of buildings known as Clark's Buildings, which are an ornament to the locality in which they are erected.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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