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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Washington King.

THE subject of this memoir was born in the city of New York, on the 5th of October, 1815. His father, who is still living, is a native of England, who emigrated early to this country, and, being a well-informed man, gave to his children all the advantages which the liberal range of studies pursued in the common schools in the city of New York afforded.

Washington King, from a boy, was fond of his book, and soon becoming an accomplished scholar, turned his attention to teaching, and, in a little time could boast of having the largest classical and English school in New York city.

On December 2d, 1836, he married Miss Cynthia M. Kelsey, of Connecticut, by whom he has two children. Believing that the great Mississippi Valley offered a wider field for the exertion of individual enterprise, he emigrated to St. Louis in 1844, and commenced mercantile and manufacturing pursuits, in which he became very successful; but in 1849 St. Louis was visited with a terrible calamity, which for a time stopped all the currents of business, and blighted the pecuniary prospects of hundreds of the thriving citizens. The event of the terrible fire, which desolated the whole of the business portion of St. Louis, is still fresh in the remembrance of many, and will ever be a marked epoch in its history.

A little while after this dreadful visitation, Mr. King determined on gratifying a long-existing desire, and started on a tour to Europe, where he remained several years, visiting the various countries of that enlightened portion of the globe, carefully noting the habits and customs of the people, and studying the languages and examining the policy of the different governments he visited. After spending two years and six months in instructive travel, he returned to St. Louis in the spring of 1852, and in 1855 he consented, at the repeated and earnest instigation of his many friends, to become a candidate for the mayoralty, and was elected to that important office.

When in office, Mr. King, who always looked upon the law as obligatory upon all, and created for the general benefit, rigidly compelled the observance of legislative enactments, and was the first mayor who put in effectual force the Prohibitory Sunday Liquor Law, and restrained the pot-house dissipation and indecorum which had so long desecrated the Sabbath; and so satisfactory was his term of office, that he has been repeatedly solicited again to become the people's candidate, but has always declined the honor. He is now at the head of the well-known Adams Express Company in this city, and his valuable time is employed in controlling the important and extensive operations connected with the duties of the company.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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