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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Jonathan Jones.

JONATHAN JONES was born near Oxford, state of Ohio, August 5th, 1813. His parents, David and Maria Jones, were of Welsh descent, and came from Pennsylvania to Ohio at an early day, and in 1815 removed to Cincinnati. In that city Mr. Jones followed the carpenter business for thirty years, and died in 1846. Jonathan Jones is one of the four children now surviving out of the eighteen children which blessed the union of his parents. His industrious father early inculcated in him a spirit of industry, and up to the age of fifteen he spent much of his time in assisting him in his shop. The advantages he had for education were limited, though in a short time he knew all that the country school could teach him.

Some natures ripen into manhood early, and Jonathan was anxious to get into a business where he could commence a beginning on the future. With the consent of his father, he engaged in the store of Timothy D. Rose, and in a short time, by his business capacities, succeeded to the possession of the store of his employer, in conjunction with Thomas B. Anderson.

Many years of habitual attention to a lucrative business did not satisfy Mr. Jones. All of his leisure time he had devoted to mental culture, and, having stored his mind with useful knowledge, he determined to put into execution what had always been the darling wish of his soul — the cravings of his nature — he determined on becoming a teacher. Having well matured his plan, he quickly brought it to completion, and established the first commercial college on the new system that was known in the West.

In 1841, Mr. Jones came to St. Louis, and "Jones's well-known Commercial College" soon became incorporated by an act of the legislature of Missouri, and is one of the most popular institutions of the state. Mr. Jones has left his mark upon the times in which he has lived. His motto has been "Excelsior," and his conduct in life has corresponded to his maxim. He is of untiring industry. He attends to his college and his farm, preaches every Sunday in a Christian church, and sometimes during the week; and is a member of the St. Louis bar — all of his duties he properly fulfils.

Mr. Jones was wedded in early life to Rebecca, daughter of Isaac Wallace, of Cincinnati, and resides on his handsome farm, a few miles from St. Louis. He is one of the few men who live to some purpose, and whose works will live after them. There are in the city of St. Louis more than a thousand of its business men who have been educated under his improved system of book-keeping, and are living testimonials of his usefulness.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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