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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Edward Walsh.

THE subject of this memoir was born in the county of Tipperary, Ireland, December 27th, 1798. His father was an industrious farmer having a large family of children, eleven in number, all of whom he raised in the habits of industry and economy. He sent his children to school until they were large enough to fill a situation, and they were then put to some employment.

Young Edward Walsh was suffered to remain at school until twelve years of age, and was then put into the store of a cousin, where he remained for four years. After the expiration of that period, he went into business with his brother, who kept a mill and brewing establishment, where he staid until 1818, when he received a letter from his cousin in Louisville, which determined him to exile himself from the green fields of Erin and seek a home in the United States of America, where the institutions were not under royal control, and where the prospects of success in the business walks of life were so much more flattering. He made hasty preparations for his journey, and departing from his native land, reached New York June 7th, 1818.

In those early days the iron horse was not known, and all long journeys had to be performed on horseback; and it was on horseback that Edward Walsh performed his journey from Baltimore to Pittsburg, at which place he got a flat-boat and took passage to Louisville, and arrived there, after a tedious passage on the Ohio, of forty days. At that time Louisville did not have the hygienic celebrity it now enjoys, and was known, on the contrary, as being the seat of malignant maladies, which circumstance influenced Edward Walsh to leave the town and start for Missouri. He came to St. Louis in October 1818, and after understanding well the neighboring localities, he determined to settle at St. Genevieve county, where he put up a mill. In this pursuit he remained engaged at St. Genevieve very profitably until 1824, when he sold out his business, and after a little time spent in St. Louis in determining upon another suitable location, he went to Madison county, where he again engaged in the mill business, but remaining but a short time, he again sold out and returned to St. Louis.

At that time Edward Walsh determined upon changing his pursuit, and, in partnership with his brother, entered upon the general merchandising business, the firm being known as J. & E. Walsh. Not being partial to his new vocation, in 1831 he sold out his interest and commenced milling on a large scale in St. Louis, having three mills, one of which is still funning, and having been in constant operation since 1827, has manufactured more flour than any other mill in St. Louis.

As a miller, as in every thing else, Edward Walsh was successful, and he then became connected with the steamboat business, and so largely at

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one time, that he had invested more than $100,000. He possessed an interest in some of the finest boats that landed on the levee of St. Louis. He has also dealt largely in lead, which, by the alchemical virtues of industry and judgment, he transmuted into golden profits for himself.

In writing the biography of Edward Walsh, we feel it a bounden duty to pay a passing tribute to the worth and merits of his brother, John Walsh, now deceased, with whom he was identified so many years in business pursuits.

John Walsh, during his life, was esteemed for his business capacity, and those pure principles of character which go to make up the truly honorable man. He was not only successful in his business calling, but he was emphatically a lover of the human family — known for his benevolence and his charities, and endeared to a large circle of friends. He has shuffled off his "mortal coil," but his virtues live after him; and when the name of John Walsh is now mentioned, it is with that respect which a character so pure as his so well deserves from posterity.

Mr. Walsh has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Maria Tucker, whom he married in 1822, and his present wife, whom he married February 11th, 1840, was Miss Julia Denum. He has been connected with many of our public institutions, for his name has good weight and strength in the business world, and is an important auxiliary to any thing to which it is attached. Since the first establishment of the Bank of the State of Missouri, he has been one of its directors. He was also a director in the old Missouri Insurance Company, and is a director of the Union Insurance Company.

Mr. Walsh's business capacities are second to no one in St. Louis. He has a judgment that never errs in its calculation, and an industry that is untiring in its pursuit of business. He commenced the world without the gifts of fortune or the aid of auspicious patronage, but made his way to wealth and influence by his own efforts, and is indebted to no extraneous aid for their possession. When a boy he came to a new continent, and without any adventitious aid has become one of the leading business men in the state of his adoption.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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