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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Thomas A. Buckland.

HE who has reaped a plenteous harvest in the field where he has labored, and has won an honorable name in the community where he has lived, well deserves a biography; and the events of his life furnish a useful lesson to posterity.

The subject of this memoir was born in the county of Sussex, England. His parents belonged to the honest yeomanry of that country, who brought up their children to habits of industry, and early instilled into them the love and practice of the moral attributes. They gave their children a practical education, and then set them to work in some suitable business. Thomas, after receiving his share of schooling, was sent to learn the milling business, and his father, for this privilege, had to pay his instructor the sum of five hundred dollars. He remained under instruction for three years and a half, and taking the fever of emigration, which everywhere spread around him, he started for the city of New York, where he arrived in 1836. From there he went to Rochester on a tour of observation, and, after a short sojourn, seeing nothing attractive in the way of business pursuits, which he thought would quickly remunerate his efforts, he started for St. Louis, which had commenced making some noise in the commercial world. While on his way, he formed the acquaintance of Mr. Charles Todd, on board of a steamboat, and a friendship was cemented between the two, which exists to the present time, and has extended to other portions of the family.

At that time, there were but two mills in St. Louis, and Mr. Buckland determined on visiting the flourishing cities on the Mississippi, before permanently locating himself. He was at Quincy, Naples, and other places, and, at the former place, while he was waiting for the materials to be brought, to repair a mill, the work which he had engaged to do, he went to mauling rails, so as not to lose, in idleness, time which could be profitable, devoted to other pursuits.

Leaving all of these towns, with the conviction that St. Louis furnished the best opening for the thorough business man, he returned, and engaged as miller with Daniel D. Page, the most extensive milling merchant in the place. His salary was $600 per annum, and found in board. Leaving this situation, Mr. Buckland went to La Grange, where he built a mill, and carried it on for the six ensuing years. Then, quitting La Grange, he came again to St. Louis, and there purchased the Park Mills, then a diminutive concern, and no more like the present Park Mills, than a pigmy is like a giant. It was burnt, and then built in its present improved style, in 1849. Mr. Buckland, even in his early days, when his battle with the world was the strongest, supported his mother and his sister, and has since educated three of his brother's children, sending them to the first institutions and colleges.

Mr. Buckland has been very active in the fire department, and has passed through all the different grades of office, from a runner with the engine to being president of the Firemen's Association. He took a very

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active part in the adoption of the steam-engine in the department, and, also, in giving pay to the firemen. He was the first who advocated the necessity of a Millers' Exchange, now known as the Merchants' Exchange, and is connected with some of the most important corporations of the city. He was one of the corporators of the Millers and Manufacturers' Insurance Company, also a director; director in the Mechanics' Bank; in the Western River Wrecking Company; in the Masonic Hall Association, also treasurer; and, also, vice-president of the St. Louis Mutual Building Association. His name is a tower of strength in every enterprise with which he is connected.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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