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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html


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Brigadier-General Daniel Marsh Frost.

THE subject of this memoir was a native of Schenectady county, state of New York and was born August 9th, 1823. His ancestors came to this country, from England, during its early settlement, and during the Revolutionary War one of his grandfathers fought faithfully under the banner of his country.

The father of General Frost was a man of fine attainments; he was appointed surveyor and civil engineer in the state of New York, and made the first complete survey, soundings, and map of Hudson City. He also commanded a volunteer company in the last war against England.

General Frost, the subject of this sketch, had all the advantages of early education, until, at the age of sixteen, he entered the Military Academy at West Point, and graduated with high honors at that celebrated institution in 1844. He was attached to the 1st regiment of artillery, and, after some service at various forts, he was sent to Florida. Becoming tired of seaboard garrison life, he was transferred to the regiment of mounted riflemen in 1840, and in the same year went to Mexico, under General Scott, fighting in all the battles in which his illustrious commander was engaged, until the "star-spangled banner" floated over the battlements of Mexico.

General Frost, in the many battle-fields in which he was engaged, reaped plentifully of military laurels, and at the battle of Cerro Gordo was especially complimented by his commander-in-chief. At the declaration of peace, he returned to Missouri, and was soon after ordered across the Plains to Oregon City. The following year he returned to St. Louis, where he was married to the daughter of the late Major Graham, who was at one time one of the aids of General Harrison.

The judgment and military abilities of General Frost have always been held in the highest estimation by his superior officers, and he was selected by the secretary of war, as an efficient officer to send to Europe, to gather information concerning cavalry drill and discipline. After returning from, Europe, in 1852, he joined his regiment in Texas, and shortly after, was wounded in an engagement with the Indians. In 1853, he returned to St. Louis, and resigned his commission, but was chosen the commander of the Washington Guards, which he held for five years. In 1854, he was elected to the state Senate, and served in that body till 1858, at the expiration of which he was elected brigadier-general and commander of the first military district of Missouri.

General Frost is scarcely in the summer of manhood, and, with youth, fame, position, and character, can hope for all things that can gratify an honorable ambition.

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Edwards, Richard; Hopewell, M.; Ashley, William; Barry, James G.; Belt and Priest; Casey, John; Hall, W.; Labaum, Louis A.; Leduc, Mary Philip; Lisa, Manuel; O'Fallon, Benjamin; Piernas; Port Folio; Risley, W.; Stoddard, Amos; Williams, Henry W.; Yore, John E. Edwards's Great West and Her Commercial Metropolis, Embracing a General View of the West, and a Complete History of St. Louis, from the Landing of Ligueste, in 1764, to the Present Time; with Portraits and Biographies of Some of the Old Settlers, and Many of the Most Prominent Buisiness Men . St. Louis: Office of Edwards's Monthly, A Journal of Progress, 1860. [format: book], [genre: biography; history; letter; narrative]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=edwards.html
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