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Skillman, W. D. The Western Metropolis; or St. Louis in 1846 . St. Louis: W.D. Skillman, 1846. [format: book], [genre: advertisement; catalogue; history; guidebook; ledger; report]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=skillman.html


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St. Anthony's Falls.

At the Falls of St. Anthony, 843 miles above the mouth of the Missouri, the river has a perpendicular descent of about sixteen feet, with formidable rapids above and below. The

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rapid above the Falls has a descent of ten feet in three hundred yards, and below the Falls a descent of fifteen feet in the distance of half a mile. An island at the brink of the Falls divides the current into two parts, the larger of which is on the West side of the Island; and immediately below the Falls are large fragments of rock, in the interstices of which some alluvial soil has accumulated, supporting a stinted growth of cedars. The whole fall is about forty-one feet in less than three-fourths of a mile. All this has nothing of the grandeur of Niagara, but the cataract, and the surrounding scenery, are eminently picturesque and beautiful. In times of high floods it may approach to the sublime.

The width of the river above the Falls is five or six hundred yards, and at the Falls is two hundred and twenty-seven yards, but narrows to two hundred yards at a short distance below.

The following description of St. Anthony's Falls is from the "Saint Louis Reveille:"

"‘Mene-ha-ha,’ or ‘The water that laughs!’ So are the Falls of Saint Anthony called by the children of the wild. Who shall say that the red skins "have not a chiming fancy? The Laughing Waters. Truly, one should dream awhile beneath the "singing trees" of the Arabian Nights, ere trusting himself to discourse of these merry gushings, these leaping, laughing, foam-voices of the North!

"These Falls are neither as "sublime" as Niagara, as "picturesque" as Glenn's, as "peculiar" as Montmorency's nor so "pretty" as the Passaic; but, scrambling down the banks, and jumping from fragment to fragment of their rocky bed, till amid tinted spray the roaring mirth of the whole watery scene bursts closely on him, the visitor must take it coolly indeed, if he miss the boasted features of either of those above mentioned. These present have no height, but a world of variety. Their breadth, some third of a mile, is broken by huge blocks, wrecks of a former bed, a strange, rough island, and intervening deposites of timber, while surging round all, leap the loud shouting waters. Indigo-blue, bright green, and frosted silver, tumbling and changing, circling, rushing, flashing, and the grand thought still ringing over all, "Two thousand miles away sounds the far sea."

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Skillman, W. D. The Western Metropolis; or St. Louis in 1846 . St. Louis: W.D. Skillman, 1846. [format: book], [genre: advertisement; catalogue; history; guidebook; ledger; report]. Permission: St. Louis Mercantile Library
Persistent link to this document: http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/file.php?file=skillman.html
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