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Letter from Colonel Joseph Reed, Adjutant-General, to Henry Remsen: The disposition of prisoners arrested as persons of dangerous principles, belongs to the Congresses, Committees, etc., of the respective Colonies. The General cannot give any direction about them, but suggests that they may be removed from the City of New-York, as soon as possible. [1776-06-26] [S4-V6-p1084] [Document Details][Complete Volume]


Letter from Colonel Joseph Reed, Adjutant-General, to Henry Remsen: The disposition of prisoners arrested as persons of dangerous principles, belongs to the Congresses, Committees, etc., of the respective Colonies. The General cannot give any direction about them, but suggests that they may be removed from the City of New-York, as soon as possible

Page v6:1084

JOSEPH REED (ADJUTANT-GENERAL) TO HENRY REMSEN.

Head-Quarters, June 26, 1776.

SIR: The taking proper measures for apprehending a person of dangerous principles and conduct last evening, prevented my writing you as I proposed respecting the prisoners brought in yesterday. I mentioned what passed between us to the General, but, on referring to the resolution of Congress, we found the disposition of prisoners wholly given to the Congresses, Committees, &c., of the respective Colonies. In this view his Excellency did not choose to give any directions about them; but at the same time suggested his wishes that they might be removed out of the city as soon as possible. How far the Colony of Connecticut might choose to take prisoners captivated in other Provinces, unless sent by the Continental Congress, must be left to the wisdom of your own Convention. They now have many under those circumstances. If any further guard is necessary, upon receiving an intimation on that head it shall be immediately complied with.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

JOSEPH REED.

To Henry Remsen, Esq., New-York.


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Letter from Colonel Joseph Reed, Adjutant-General, to Henry Remsen: The disposition of prisoners arrested as persons of dangerous principles, belongs to the Congresses, Committees, etc., of the respective Colonies. The General cannot give any direction about them, but suggests that they may be removed from the City of New-York, as soon as possible. [1776-06-26] [S4-V6-p1084] [Document Details][Complete Volume]



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