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Letter from London. Advises the Colonies to unite in defence of American Liberty. Power of the Ministry -- their hatred of liberty. Lords Chatham, Camden, and Rockingham, are friendly to America. [1774-04-27] Anonymous. [S4-V1-p0248] [Document Details][Complete Volume]


From a Gentleman in London to One in New-York

Page v1:248

FROM A GENTLEMAN IN LONDON TO ONE IN NEW YORK.
Extract.

London, April 27, 1774.

I hope there is no necessity of admonishing you to unite in the defence of the liberty of America. The stroke may first be felt in Boston; but that man who does not perceive it meant against the whole line of Colonies must be blind indeed. Trust me, the views of Administration are to subdue and enslave you. They have so sure a majority in both Houses of Parliament, that they find no difficulty in executing every wish of the King, either in the ruin of this country or America. I love to speak the naked truth. Tell the people of America, that the favourite Ministry of the most powerful Monarch in Europe, hate the name of liberty, and abhor the man who dares support the principles of it. They suffer no man to share their confidence, until he has proved himself an unprincipled apostate, and spurns at the idea of a virtuous opinion. This may be supposed one of the great reasons why so few of the first rank among us openly espouse the cause of America; for it is the cause of virtue, in which nothing can be gained, but much lost. The infinite increase of perquisites, pensions, and places, in consequence of an uncontrolled direction of the India Company, has almost silenced opposition. Having, therefore, but few friends left, and even those left without power to do you any essential service you must rely upon nothing but your own wisdom and virtue to disappoint the wicked purposes of your powerful enemies; for their interest, inclinations, and even existence, all unite to work your ruin. I do not venture to point out what steps you should take to avert the storm, or direct it to your advantage. If you mean to negotiate any thing with this country, let it be done with dignity and firmness.

I have the satisfaction of assuring you that Lord Chatham is that kind of friend to America which he ever has been; he came to town on purpose to watch and oppose the present proceedings, but has ever since been confined to his bed. Lord Camden and Lord Rockingham are your friends.

The two Sheriff' s of London, with other gentlemen, natives of America, have another petition now ready to present to the House of Commons, against the Bills now before them. Sir George Savile, has agreed to bring it in and support it.

As to the merchants, many of them were such idiots as to wait on Lord North, and return to their country houses perfectly satisfied that he meant nothing inimical to you, because he said so. He served the East India Directors the same trick not many months since.

I have no doubt but that the people of England will, in six months time see the folly of those measures, and drive the Ministry to the necessity of giving up the question, especially if you have spirit enough to act properly.


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Letter from London. Advises the Colonies to unite in defence of American Liberty. Power of the Ministry -- their hatred of liberty. Lords Chatham, Camden, and Rockingham, are friendly to America. [1774-04-27] Anonymous. [S4-V1-p0248] [Document Details][Complete Volume]



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