Chicago Tribune July 3, 1881 Page 2

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James A. Garfield Falls Before the Assassin's Bullet.

The Deed Committed by a Madman Named Charles J. Guiteau.

Half-Past Nine O'clock of Saturday the Baleful Moment.

The President, Arm-in-Arm with Secretary Blaine, Was Entering a Depot.

From an Ambuscade the Maniac Fired Two Balls into the President.

One Took Effect in the Back and the Other in the Arm

Journey of a Brave Little Woman from Long Branch to Washington.

Magnificent Courage and Good Cheer of the Chief Executive.

A Constant Tocsin of death Sounded Up to About 9 at Night.

A Thankful Nation Listens to Better News After That Happy Hour.

GARFIELD

JULY 3, 1881. For The Chicago Tribune. Garfield is stricken down by the assassin's hand today along the land the tiding Hashes From town to town. As In a mighty pool a ponderous pebble plashes, Startling its tenants, filling them with fear, So all men shudder here, tremble, and whisper low, Regretful, sad, and elow, "What can the motive be of deeds like this?" On all Such hideous crime The curse of Heaven must fall For endless time. The hiss of every honest man the world contains, Shame, infamy, remorse, and clanking chains Must follow him who murders, greet his gaze with none to pity, pamper, love or praise. An ignominious doom an unregretted tomb. EUGENE K. HALL

AT THE DEPOT.

FIRST ACCOUNT.

Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.

Washington, D.C. July 2-l0-a.m. Gen. Garfield was shot just as he was entering the ladies' room at the Pennsylvania depot by a rough-looking countryman, said to be from New York. Two shots were fired. One entered just above the hip under the left arm, and one just above the heart on the left side. Both balls passed through. A policeman who has just left the upper rooms in the building to which the President was taken says the physicians say that he is not mortally wounded. The President himself is cheerful. The assassin's name is said to be Guiteau No possible motive is known for the attempted assassination. It is almost impossible to reach the depot, owing to the

VAST AND EXCITED CROWD.

The President was shot at 9:13, just as he was entering the ladies' room at the Philadelphia Depot. He was surrounded by most of the members of the Cabinet. Secretary Blaine stood at his immediate left. The assassin approached from behind, and stood within eighteen inches of the President when he fired. He stood directly behind the President. The first ball entered immediately above the kidneys on the left side. The President, stunned by the shot, instantly turned above, when the villain shot a second time, the bullet striking the front of the left shoulder and passing out beneath the shouIder-blade. Those who stood immediately around the assassin and the President say that the man, who is now learned to be Charles J. Guiteau, of Chicago, shouted in a tragic tone, "I am a Stalwart. It had to be done.

ARTHUR WILL NOW BE PRESIDENT"

Benson, ex-Chief of the Secret Service, happened to be standing near. He heard the shot, rushed to the assassin and, just as he was about to raise his pistol with three loaded chambers remaining; to shoot Blauine, it though, throttled him and threw him to the ground. Guiteau was then immediately overpowered by the maddened mob, and the police hurried him off with great speed to the District Jail to prevent him from being mobbed, for the news reached the street immediately, and an excited and angry crowd almost instantaneously filled every street leading the depot, and would certainly have hung the assassin to a lamppost if the police had not been so active in their movements. The President, meanwhile instantly sank to the floor. Strong hands carried him immediately to an upper office room, and a mattress was obtained from the Pullman sleeper storeroom, upon which he was laid,

BLEEDING PROFUSELY.

Doctors were summoned by telephone and telegraph, and Dr. Bliss speedily appeared upon the scene. Then soon followed him a score of the most prominent physicians in the city. Dr. Bliss at first said it was a safe wound. After he had watched, the President for a few moments he said with great thoughtfulness "It is not necessarily a mortal wound." Soon after that Col. Robert Ingersoll was admitted to the room. The President stretched out his hand, and in a voice not strong said, "I am glad you have come." Col. Ingersoll said, "Are you in pain?" The President answered "I feel a prickly sensation in my feet." One of the physicians said that that prickly sensation was not a good symptom. It might indicate that the spinal cord had been, touched. The shoulder wound is not dangerous. The only fear is from

THE WOUND BELOW THE KIDNEYS.

It has not yet been ascertained whether or not the ball passed through the body directly, or whether it struck the vertebrae and glanced around in the intestines. Upon that fact it is probable that the life of the president depends. Col. Ingersol says that the President was clear in his mind but a little dazed. His head was cold and his feet were prickly. No member of the family was near. Telegraphic connection was immediately made with Long Branch, and bulletins are being sent there every minute. About 10:30 the physicians decided to remove the President to the White House. An ambulance was in readiness, and he was removed. It was thought better to remove him while his strength would permit of it. The pistol found in the assassin's hand is a murderous-looking weapon. It was a five chambered heavy navy revolver, 44 calibre. It makes a hole as large as a musket ball.

THE REMAINING SHOTS

were evidently designed for self-defense or it is thought for Mr. Blaine. Those who say that Guiteau made a movement when stricken down as if to shoot Blaine. The latter is very calm and collected, but in tensely pale. Guiteau is understood to have been formerly Consul at Marsellies. When he was in the act of shooting he is reported to have had in his hand a letter stating that was necessary that this deed should be done. Immediately upon being taken into custody he assumed to be insane. But there is a strong suspicion that he has been instigated to do this for for some political reason Guiteau has been about town for some days. He has a very wild-looking eye, and short-cropped, bristly hair. The assassin drove to depot in advance of the President and stationed himself in the doorway of the ladies' waiting-room in the depot' As the President entered, the man fired, the ball entering the President's back just above the thigh. The President reeled and fell, the assassin firing another shot as he was falling, which passed through his coat-sleve, just grazing the arm. The assassin then remarked; "I have killed Garfield. Arthur will be president, and I am a Stalwart." The ambulance containing the President was rushed up, the avenue at great speed.

A VENERABLE PHYSICIAN

who stood near the President at the upper room in the depot building said: The President will die. The symptoms are very bad. He has twitching of the. feet and does not bleed. This is all bad." Postmaster-General James said: "I greatly fear that the wound is mortal." Col. Robert Ingersoll said: "Garfield is cool and brave, but I fear the hand of death Is laid upon him. I know death when I see it, and I think I saw the shadow of death upon his face."

AN EYEWITNESS

Special -Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune

WASHINGTON, D.C. July 2-12 p.m. -A gentleman who was an eyewitness of the attempted assassination gives the following statement of the occurrence: "I was coming down Pennsylvania avenue when I saw a carriage coming up the avenue, the horses r|unning so fast that I thought they were running away. Just as the carriage arrived in front of me a man put his head out of the window and said, "Faster, faster, faster, damn it!" After hearing this remark I thought there was something wrong, and ran after the carriage. When it reached the depot a man jumped out and entered the ladies room. He had not been there more than three minutes 'when the President arrived, stepped out of the carriage, and also entered the ladies' room. The President, after passing. through the door, was

JUST TURNING THE CORNER OF A SEAT

when the assassin, who was standing on the left of the door, fired. The ball struck the President in the back. The President fell forward. I ran into the depot, and just then the man fired again while the President was falling. The moment the President fell a policeman, who had been standing at the depot door keeping the way clear for the President and his party, grabbed the assassin by the neck, and as he pulled him out of the depot, another policeman came to his assistance. Just after firing the shot the assassin exclaimed, "I've killed Garfieid! Arthur is President. I AM A STALWART!" The policemen carried the assassin down Pennsylvania avenue on the left hand side. When the President was lying on the floor in the ladies' room he was surrounded by Secretaries Windom, James, and Blaine. Mrs Hunt, Mrs. Windom, and Mrs. James were, also standing near the President. About three or five minutes after the shooting Dr. Bliss arrived with his instruments. The President was then put on a bed and carried upstairs, where an examination was made by the doctors. Dr. Bliss, after the examination, said that the wound was not mortal, but dangerous Gen. Sherman then came.

HORROR OF THE SPECTATORS.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, DC Ju|y2. The Critic says: "This morning witnessed an event unparalleled in the history of the country. The assassination of Lincoln, coming as it did at the close of a long and desperate war, and as the last expiring throes of war's fierce hate and passion, was an initally more logical event than this horror. The assassinated President had made no enemies, had done no man wrong. The heart and soul of good nature, benevolence, and peace loving, his was to all reason and logic the last bosom among our fifty millions to invite the lead of the assassin It is, of course, too soon to discuss particulars. We can only present the facts. What the future may bring forth it is impossible to now even guess, and the occasion is too grave for guesswork. The news spread rapidly through the city and about the Departments, and in a very few minutes

MEN WERE SEEN HURRYING THROUGH THE STREETS

toward the depot Business men rushed to their doors, and could hardly be persuaded that the peace of the day had been so violently assaulted. Intelligence of the event was sent to all the police stations of the city, and the rapid hurrying of mounted police through the streets toward the depot added to the excitement." A Critic reporter interviewed the prisoner at his cell at police headquarters at a few minutes before 10 o'clock. The prisoner is a pale, emaciated, small man, with the appearance of an insane person. He gave his name as Charles Guiteau and his residence at Chicago, and stated that he was a lawyer, theologian, and politician. He expressed great anxiety to be taken to jail, where he stated he would meet Gens. Arthur and, Sherman and Collector Merritt. He states and

HE WILL REWARD ALL WHO TREAT HIM WITH RESPECT,

and that he has saved his country and proclaimed Arthur President. Guiteau says that Garfield cannot live and shall not live. He was taken to jail at 10 o'clock. The weapon was a British bulldog five-barreled nickel plated revolver, and very heavy. The handle is of bone, and four shots were still in the weapon. Guiteau, it seems, is a disappointed applicant for office. The position he desired was Consul to Marseilles. The assassination was quickly and quietly effected, and it was not until the President had fallen and the assassin bad escaped from the building that the fact became known generally. Then

A CROWD SOON COLLECTED,

and in less than ten minutes Sixth Street and B street were packed with people, and the news of the horrible affair flew from mouth to mouth and spread over the city like wildfire. An attempt was made to rush into the building, and cries were raised to lynch the assassin; but a strong force of policemen, summoned by telephone, arrived promptly on the scene and preserved order. In the meantime the President had been carried to a room upstairs, and physicians were summoned. Secretary Blaine was with the President, and is is still attending him.

J. R. COLE.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2 -3 p. m. Mr. J. R. Cole, of 'Washington, D. C., was one of the people standing in the waiting-room of the depot when the President was shot and he, with two policemen, immediately seized the would-be assassin, who made one or two efforts to release himself, and remarked, "Let my arms down," with an oath. Mr. Cole says that the man had been standing in the doorway for some time before, and had his boots blacked, and afterward went down to the sidewalk, hailed a hack driver, and asked him if that was a good team. The driver replied that it was a fast team, and the would-be murderer engaged it. He then turned and went in the depot. Five minutes afterwards, he had

FIRED UPON THE PRESIDENT.

One of the first men who, met your correspondent immediately after the President had been removed to the White House was Senator Beck, of' Kentucky, who exclaimed, "My God!I Can such things be? Garfield was the last man in the United States upon whom one would have thought such an attack would be made. I saw him Thursday night, and when he bade me good-by he slapped me on the shoulder, and I remarked that I would carry the prints of a President's hand to Kentucky. I Intended to go home this morning, but shall remain to await the result."

THE ASSASSIN'S WORDS.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2.—The Star publishes an extra which contains the following: "About half-past 9 o'clock this morning the startling news rapidly spread throughout the city that the President who was about to depart from the city, had been fatally shot at the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad depot. The intelligence, coming so unexpectedly was soon proved to be too true. The city was soon full of excitement, and, as various officials were galloping up and down the avenue, vast crowds of people made their way to the depot. President Garfield 'was shot this morning at 9:30 o'clock in the ladies' room of the Baltimore & Potomac Depot. He has just alighted from a carriage to take the cars for the north. Secretary Hunt and Mrs. Hunt, Secretary Windon and Mrs. Windom, Postmaster General James, and the rest of the party

HAD TAKEN THEIR SEATS IN THE CAR.

Col. Jamison, of the Post-Office Department, who was to have charge of the transportation of the party, was standing at the gate leading to the cars. He heard a shot, quickly followed by another. There was a rush to the ladies's room, from whence the sounds came , when President Garfield was found lying on the floor, having fell the left. Secretary Blaine cam out of the room following a man and calling, "Rock well. Where is Rockwell?" The man was seized by Officer Kearney and Mr. Parks, the depot policeman. The President was taken upstairs. Dr. Bliss arrived soon afterwards. It was soon discovered that both shots had taken effect. One struck him in the right arm below the shoulder. The other went in at the right side of the back, between the hip and kidneys It then passed forward and went down into the groin. It was probed for, but

COULD NOT BE FOUND

Dr. Bliss says that it is a dangerous wound, but not necessarily fatal. The wound in the arm does not amount to much except being painful. There is hope for the President recovering, but he is in a very critical condition. The shooting occurred when the President and Secretary Blaine were walking arm-in-arm through the ladies' room. Secretary Blaine was not going with the party, but came down to bid the President good-by. He said: The President and I were walking arm-in-arm towards the train. I heard two shots, and saw a man run. I started after him, but, seeing that he was grabbed just as he got out of the room I came to the President, and found him lying on the floor. The floor was covered with the President's blood. A number of people who were around shortly afterwards have

SOME OF THAT BLOOD ON THEIR PERSON.

I think I know the man. I think his name is Guiteau. The assassin is about five feet seven inches in height, of strong though not stout build. The weapon he used was a revolver about seven inches Iong. It had an ivory handle. The calibre was very large. It is what is known as a 'California pistol.' It made a very loud report. When arrested he said, "I did it, and want to be arrested. I am a Stalwart, and Arthur is President now. I have a letter here that I want you to give to Gen. Sherman. It will explain everything. Take me to the police station." Officers were sent to the police headquarters by order of those around the President to get the name of the assassin He very willingly wrote his name and address on a sheet of paper as follows: 'Charles Guiteau attorney-at-law, Chicago, ILL.'' The Star, in

A SECOND EXTRA,

says: "President Garfield accompanied by Blaine, drove up to the Baltimore & Potomac depot on Sixth street, and sat in their carriage near the door. Officer Kearney standing near by. President Garfield asked the officer how much time he had (meaning before the train started). The officer replied, "About ten minutes, your honor." The President, after conversing a minute or two longer, then got out of the carriage and, with Secretary Blaine, walked slowly, up the steps into the depot, Office Kearney states that he was standing close by and saluted the President by raising his hat. The President and Mr. Blaine walked through the ladies' parlor, and had entered the large reception-room in the main portion of the depot, when

TWO PISTOL-SHOTS.

were fired in rapid succession. The crowd screamed: "He’s shot the President! Arrest the man!" The assassin was making his way as fast as possible, and through the ladies' parlor towards the B street door, a carriage being there to take him away. Kearney threw himself before he seized him by both arms between the elbows and shoulders, and held him as with a vice. The pistol was in his hand when he first saw him, and he had just put it into his coat-pocket when the officers had him. The would-be assassin said. "Yes I have finished Garfield. Now Arthur is President. I am a Stalwart. Kearney secured the pistol, a heavy live-barreled English bulldog and hustled the man to police headquarters, where he was hurriedly searched and thrust into a cell

STORY OF THE CRIME

WASHINGTON, DC July 2.-The President was shot at 9:28 o'clock, as he was entering the Baltimore & Potomac Depot to take a train for Long Branch. Others of the party had taken seats in the train, and the President and Secretary Blaine entered arm-in-arm. As they reached the ladies' waiting-room, a man, who stood on the right of the President, raised his arm and deliberately fired two shots from a revolver, exclaiming as he did so, "Now we will have Arthur for President." The first shot struck the President in the right arm. The President and Secretary Blaine seemed too much bewildered to realize the truth. BIaine shouted: "Where is Col. Rockwell?" The assassin immediately fired again, and the shot took effect in the President's side, and the victim sank to the floor. CoI, Rockwell and several police officers came at once to his assistance, and he was carried to the Superintendent's room on the floor above. The President did not say a word when the first shot was fired. Meanwhile the assassin was seized by those standing near, and would have been torn to pieces but for the police. He was taken across Pennsylvania avenue to the police station, and it was there discovered that his name was Charles Guiteau, an attorney-at-law from Chicago. ILL.. Drs. Bliss and Reyburn were at the depot at the time, and went at once to the President's side. Drs. Lincoln and Thompson were sent for at once, and a hurried consultation was held, and at 10:20 a. m. an ambulance was called and the wounded Executive was lifted in. Col. Rockwell and the police officers also took seats therein, and the vehicle started for the White House. The news spread like wildfire, and Pennsyl-vania avenue was crowded almost as much as when the President rode to the White House in state on March 4. A squad of mounted police forced a passage through the throng, and officers on foot guarded the entrance to the White House grounds. The President, was carried at once to his chamber and laid upon the bed. Surgeon-General Barnes was also in attendance by this time, and a cursory examination showed that the second shot had lodged in the groin, just over the kidney, and will, in all probability, prove fatal; but the physicians still said there was hope.

"POST" EXTRA.

Special dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2.—The Post, in an extra just issued, says the President entered the depot by the B street door, and was passing through the ladies' room. The murderer followed, and immediately on getting inside fired two shots, the first taking effect in the small of the back and going toward the spine, the other in the fleshy part of the arm. Everybody ran at the firing except a lady, who, seeing the President fall, hastened to raise him. Intense excitement was created by the firing, and an immense crowd soon gathered. The President was taken to the Superintendent's room, where Drs. Blair, Woodward, and other surgeons were soon in attendance. After a brief examination they pronounced the wound in the back very dangerous. About 10 o'clock the President was removed to the Executive Mansion. The assassin, after the firing started to leave the depot, and, as he ran out,

THREW A LETTER BEHIND HIM

addressed to Gen. Sherman, saying: " I have just shot the President. I deem it a political necessity." He made a desperate attempt to escape, but was finally captured and taken to police headquarters. When the excited crowd found that the man was in custody they were almost uncontrollable, and the murmurs of revenge grew into open threats. Soon the cry "Get him and lynch him!" passed from lip to lip, and a move was made towards police headquarters. The authorities, anticipating such a demonstration, took the man from headquarters to what was deemed a secure place but, entertaining fears that the maddened populace would get him there, he was taken to jail. Dr. Lincoln, who was present, had the police ambulance sent for, and the wounded man was taken to the White House. As the cortege left the Doctor remarked that he might not live two hours, but it all depended upon the amount of internal hemorrhage that took place from the lower wound.

THE HACKMAN,

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D, C., July 2—The following is a statement by 0'Connor, the hackman who drove the assassin to jail: "I was on Sixth street, near the depot. I was talking to Mr. John Prece, the livery-stable man He left men, but soon came back and said that the President was shot. I soon saw two policemen going down towards police headquarters with the prisoner. I ran after them and saw him. About ten minutes after that l was called upon from headquarters to convey the prisoner to the jail. Detective George McElfresh, Lieut. Eckloff, and Lieut. Estin had him in charge. They instructed me to drive very fast. On the way down two officers stopped and called the attention of two Government men. I presume, and said that the President was shot.

THE PRISONER

was in the back part of the carriage between two officers with his face covered with their hands across his face. The men who stopped the carriage asked to see his face, and the officers took away their hands and showed them his face. The two men then said, "Yes, that is the same sun of a gun who was hanging around there yesterday." I drove the party down and left them at the jail. The prisoner was very quiet all the time. The route I took to the jail was down Pennsylvania avenue, around the Capitol, through the Capitol grounds, down East Capitol street to the Lincoln Park, and to the jail."

SARAH B. WHITE.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, DC, July 2-The first to reach the President was Mrs. Sarah B. White, a lady in charge of the ladies' waiting-room, who saw him enter, and saw the man raise his hand and fire. She was abouttwenty feet from the President when shot. Very few were in the waiting-room, and no one immediately with the President. At 10:20 the President was removed from the depot to the ambulance and conveyed to the White house A gentleman who was standing in the entrance as the President was carried out, says the President's face was as blanched as that of a corpse, the eyes dead closed, and there was that peculiar half-languid, half-nervous twitch of the muscles indicative of internal bleeding. Postmaster Ainger, who was present at the shooting, said as the body passed by. "I have been in many a battle, and have seen many men mortally wounded, and never a one with a face that more clearly showed certain death than the President's."

BENSON.

Washington DC, July 2.—Benson ex-Chief of the Secret Service, who happened to be standing near, heard the shot, rushed to the assassin, and just as he was about to raise his pistol, with three chambers still loaded to shoot Secretary Blaine it is thought, throttled him and threw him to the ground. 'The pistol found in the assassin's hand is a murderous-looking weapon. It was a five-chambered, heavy navy revolver of 44 calibre. It makes a hole as large as a musket ball. The balls remaining in it were designed for self-defense, or, as some think, for Blaine. Those who stood near say that Ghiteau made a movement when stricken down as if to

SHOOT SECRETARY BLAIRE

The latter was very calm and collected, but intensely pale. The doctors were summoned by telephone and telegraph, and Dr. Bliss speedily appeared upon the scene. There soon followed him a score of the most prominent physicians in the city. Dr. Bliss at first said: "It is a safe wound." After he had watched the President for a few moments, he said with great thoughfulness: "It is not necessarily a mortal wound." Soon after that Col. Robert Ingersoll was admitted to the room. The President stretched out his hand, and in a voice not strong said:

"I AM GLAD YOU HAVE COME"

Col. Ingersoll said: '"Are you in pain?" The President answered: "I feel a prickly sensation in my feet." One of the physicians said that the prickly sensation was not a good symptom. A gentleman who was an eyewitness of the attempted assassination gives the following statement of the occurrence: I was coming down Pennsylvania avenue when I saw a carriage coming up the avenue, the horses running so fast that I thought they were running away. Just as the carriage arrived in front of me a man put his head out of the window, and said: "Faster, faster, faster, damn it!" After hearing this remark I thought there was something wrong, and ran after the carriage. When it reached the depot, a man jumped out and entered the ladies' room. He had not been there more than three minutes

WHEN THE PRESIDENT ARRIVED,

stepped out of his carriage, and entered the ladies' room. The President, after passing through the door, was just turning the corner of a seat when the assassin, who was standing on the left of the door, fired. The ball struck the President in the back and he fell forwards. I ran into the depot, and just then the man tired again while the President was falling. The moment the President fell a policeman, who had been standing at the depot door keeping the way clear for the President and his party, grabbed the assassin by the neck, and as he pulled him out of the depot another policeman came to his assistance. Just after firing the shot the assassin exclaimed: '"I have killed Garfield. Arthur is President. I am a Stalwart." While the President was lying on the floor in the ladies' room he was surrounded by Secretaries Windom, James, and Blaine. Mrs. Hunt, Miss Windom, and Mrs. James were also standing near the President. In three or five minutes

AFTER THE SHOOTING

Dr. Bliss arrived. The President was then put on a bed and carried upstairs, where an examination was made by the doctors. Gen. Sherman then came and called an ambulance to carry the President to the White House. A spectator thus described the removal of the President to the White House: The President lay in the ambulance propped up with pillows and with his right arm thrown over his head. His face was ashy white, but bore a calm, placid look. He seemed perfectly conscious, and opened his eyes frequently to view the surroundings. While he was being carried upstairs he smiled sadly and waved his hand in recognition of friends who were gathered about him. His sufferings must have been intense, but be gave no sign of it, and was as gentle and submissive as a child.

SECRETARY BLAINE WAS MET

by a representative of the press just as he was about leaving the White House after the physicians had been called in for consultation. He said: "I don't know what to make of it. It is too horrible. The man who did the shooting has been hanging around the Department of State for sometime. He has had no occasion, beyond his own desires to apply for an appointment, and we have never encouraged him. He is crazy, I believe. Guiteau has been around the White House for several days, acting in a strange manner, and the attaches thought him crazy. He was noticed in the White House grounds at dusk last. evening. This morning he engaged a carriage at a stable, and said he wanted a quick team. He wanted to stop at the depot only a minute and then go over to Arlington.

SENOR CAMACHO.

NEW YORK, July 2.-Senor Camacho, Minister in this country from Venezuela, who resides here, was present in the depot at Washington today when President Garfield was shot by Charles Guiteau. Mr. Camacho arrived in this city this afternoon from Washington. He gave the following account of the attempted assassination of the President: "I was in Washington looking after the interests of Venezuela. I had made arrangements to visit New York this morning in company with four lady friends, members of my family. I was to meet them at the Baltimore & Potomac Railroad Depot at 9:15 a. m.

A FEW MOMENTS AFTER

9 o'clock I alighted from my carriage and entered the station. After purchasing my ticket I walked leisurely about the depot, when presently I saw a carriage drive up and two gentlemen alight therefrom. I took Iittle notice of them at first, but in a minute I observed that the two men wore President Garfield and Secretary Blaine. The President and Secretary stood beside the carriage and conversed together for some minutes, when they walked into the depot. As they entered the depot the President and the Secretary both bowed to me. I had just raised my hat and was about turning around for the appearance of my lady friends when suddenly I heard the report of a revolver. Quickly I wheeled around, and before me I beheld

THE STAGGERING FORM OF THE PRESIDENT

of the United States. I also saw the would-be assassin within a few feet of the President. He had a revolver in his right hand, his knees were slightly bent, and he took two or three hasty steps towards the President and fired again. The first ball took effect in the President's right side, and the second struck him in the back. When the second shot was fired the President fell to the floor. The would-be assassin, seeing Gen. Garfield fall, turned and attempted to escape by the B street entrance. I hurried toward that door, and when the villain saw that I intended to head him off he turned and ran toward the opposite, door, where he was caught by a number of employees in the depot. When the President was shot and when be fell he spoke not a word, nor did his would-be murderer. It was quickly noised about the depot that the President had been shot and the doors of the depot were at once closed, in order to prevent the crowd from rushing in. When Secretary Blaine heard the report of the revolver he sprang toward the door, but when he realized that the President had been shot he immediately ran to his assistance. The man who shot the President had a determined look upon his face, and did not resemble a crazy man. He was calm and resolute, and did not attempt to run away until he saw the President fall."

THE DOCTORS.

THE BALL.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2.-Dr. Woodward, of the Surgeon-General's office, says that he did not examine the President's wound, but Dr. Bliss and Dr. Barnes gave him the explanation of it. The President was shot from the right as he entered the ladies' reception-room of the depot with Secretary Blaine. The ball entered above the third rib, but whether it has taken its course towards the spine has not yet been ascertained. The wound was probed by Dr. Bliss, who reports that in inserting the probe the course of the ball did not extend towards the spine, still it is not certain it did not. It is the unanimous opinion of the physicians that what was needed for the President was not the probing of the wound, but rest. More can be told as to the seriousness of the wound after the President has urinated and had a movement of the bowels. It will be some hours yet, and may be a day, before it can be definitely settled whether the wound is or is not mortal.

DR. MORRIS,

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON D. C., June 2-5 p.m.-Dr. Basil Norris said to the writer:" He is evidently growing weaker every hour from internal hemorrhage. Of course it may be proceeding from the severing of some artery, or from the liver. He is too weak now to stand the usual operation of an examination with the fingers, and probing cannot be thought of now. He complained a. great deal of pain, and requested, if they thought proper, to give a hypodermic injection to alleviate it. There is just one chance. If the hemorrhage ceases and there is enough vitality there may be a turning point for the better." He added that no military demonstration had been ordered beyond the placing of troops around the White House to preserve order, etc.

DEATH-KNELLS.

12:40 P. M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2-12:40 p. m-Dr. Norris says that the constant probing for the bullet has greatly weakened the President and that it has been decided to allow him to sleep, if possible, until 3 o'clock, when a consultation will be held and another attempt made to find the bullet then. It is believed the bullet is in the pelvic cavity. The President is now sleeping. There are the gravest fears of the final result. Soldiers are guarding the White-House grounds, and admission is impossible except by a pass from the private secretary. Every effort is made to secure absolute quite. The President is now sleeping.

1 P.M.

Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D.C., July 2, l p.m.-Bulletin issued by Dr. D.W. Bliss at 1 p.m. "The President is somewhat restless, but is suffering less pain, Pulse 112. Some nausea and vomiting has recently occurred. Considerable hemorrhage has taken place from the wound. Since then it is understood that the symptoms are not favorable, although no bulletin has been issued.

3 P. M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C. July 2— 2 p.m.-One of the physicians in attendance at the White House says that in the last twenty minutes the President's symptoms have rapidly grown worse and that there is now scarcely any hope of his recovery. His pulse is at 112, and is increasing. There are marked indications of internal hemorrhage. He is purging.

AT 3 O'CLOCK P. M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D.C. July 2.- There are two contrary reports as to the condition the President. Surgeon-General Barnes is reported to have just said that the ball has not been found, that the President is spitting blood and that there is no hope. Another says that another attempt will be made at 3 o'clock to find the ball, and that nothing defiant can be said until then. Senator Beck, who has just come from the White House, says that the President has rallied some and that there are hopes. The best opinion now is, however, that the ball is in the intestine cavity. The President is conscious all the time. Mrs. Garfield had left Long Branch for New York this morning to meet the Presidential party there. The Pennsylvania Road has telegraphed to all stations to clear the track for the special train that is to bring Mrs. Garfield to this city with the utmost possible dispatch.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2.-Dr. Bliss says the reaction from the shock of the injury has been very gradual. He is suffering some pain, but it is thought best not to disturb him by making any exploration for the ball until after the consultation at 3 p. m. The physicians who will be present, at 3 o'clock are D. W. Bliss, M. Ford Huntington, U. S. A. J. J. Woodward, U. S. A ; Smoth Townshend, Health Officer; N. S. Lincoln Robert Ruburn, Surgeon-General Barnes, Dr. Basil Norris, U.S.A.; Surgeon-General Wales, U. S. N.; C. D. Parvis, D. C. Patterson.

3; 15 P.M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON D. C., July 2-3:15 p. m.—The President of the Pennsylvania Railroad telegraphs that the road is clear, and that Mrs. Garfield will arrive between 5 and 6 o'clock. Dr, Bliss, however, has just said that the President cannot live until his wife arrives.

5 P.M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2-5 p. m.—The scene at the White House is a sad one. All the members of the Cabinet are in attendance in the anteroom. It will be their last Cabinet meeting of this Administration. The Council Chamber has become a room of death. Sur-geon-General Barnes says the President, may last until 10 o'clock. He Is under the influence of strong opiates to allay the intense pain. It is now expected that Mrs. Garfield will arrive in time to be present at her husband's death. Of his recovery no one now entertains a hope. An injection was just administered, which was immediately followed by vomiting of water. The physicians have not yet ventured to make any further examination. The President is entirely conscious, and every few moments anxiously asks when Mrs. Garfield will arrive. She is now expected at 6 p. m.

5:30 P. M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2.-The President's pulse has reached 198, and he is now expected to live but a short time.

5:40 P. M.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2-5:40 . The President is now sleeping quietly. He dropped asleep about fifteen minutes ago. A telegram was just received at the Executive Mansion from the President of the Baltimore & Potomac Railway stating that a special train with Mrs. Garfield on board left Baltimore at 5:23, and will arrive here about 6:10 p. m. A gentleman from the sickroom said the President's son James was crying, and that when the President noticed it he said: "Jimmie, don't cry. The head is still all right, but the trouble is elsewhere."

6 P. M.

Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2-6 p. m.-Gen. Garfield's pulse is now 110 and very feeble. The doctors think his liver is perforated by the ball, and that he cannot live more than two hours.

6:40 P. M.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2—6:40 p. m.—The President is under the influence of morphine, and is consequently suffering much less pain than he was earlier in the day, but that his condition is critical in the extreme cannot be doubted. He will scarcely survive an hour unless some almost miraculous change takes place in his condition very soon. The engine of the special train which is bearing Mrs. Garfield to Washington broke a piston-rod at Bowie, but another engine has been sent to her, and the delay is not great. The following telegram was sent at 6 p. m.: To the Hon. Chester A. Arthur, Vice-president, New York City: At this hour (6 o'clock) the condition of the President is very alarming. He it losing his strength, and the worst may be apprehended. James G. Blaine. Secretary of State

7 P. M.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2-7p.m.—The President is still living and part of his family are at his bedside, receiving his words. No change in his condition, and there are only faint hopes of his recovery.

7:40 P. M.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHlNGTON, D.C.

July 2-7:40 p. m.—The President's condition is not perceptibly changed, either for better or worse. His voice is strong, his mind unimpaired and he talks freely.

8 P. M.

WASHINGTON D. C., July 2—8 p.m.,-The President is very low, and sinking. Pulse 159, but conscious. His physicians say be cannot live more than two hours. Mrs. Garfield arrived an hour ago.

8:25 P. M.

EXECUTlVE MANSION, WASHlNGTON, D.C.

July 2—8:25 p. m.-The President is again sinking, and there is little, if any, hope.

GOD BE PRAISED.

8:30 P. M.

WASHINGTON D. C., July 2—8:30 p.m. President is sleeping pleasantly and is more comfortable. Pulse 128, temperature 98, slightly above nominal, respiration 23, and more regular.

D.W. Bliss, M.D.

9:20 P. M.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D.C.

July 2-9:20 p. m.—The President has rallied a little within the past three-quarters of an hour and his symptoms are a little more favorable. He continues brave and cheerful. About the time he began to rally, he said to Doctor Bliss "Doctor, what are the indications?" Dr. Bliss replied "There is a chance of recovery." "Well, then," replied the President cheerfully. "We will take that chance." The President is now sleeping. 10:l5 P. M. Washington, D. C., July 2.-Postmast-General James has just sent the following telegram to New York: " Secretary Blaine has just cabled the foreign Ministers that at this hour (10:15p.m.) the President's condition has improved. In the judgment of all the attending physicians the change is marked and hopeful."

10:40 P. M.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 2—10:40 p.m. The President's symptoms continue to grow more favorable, and to afford more ground for hope. His temperature is now normal. His pulse has fallen four beats since the last official bulletin, and the absence of blood in the discharge from

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